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How To Tie A Scarf Chart – 11 Masculine Ways To Tie Scarves

How does a man tie a scarf?

A simple question – but one that has become more complex as the scarf itself has become a more feminine accessory over the last 50 years.

This has led to a shift in how this classic men’s accessory is viewed.

That’s unfortunate.

The scarf is a classic, masculine piece of menswear that serves the functional purpose of protecting the neck.

In most cases – it keeps our necks warm.  But the silk scarf was originally used to protect a pilots neck from chaffing when open cockpits where the rule.  They have also been used for centuries by those living in desert areas to protect from dust and the sun.

So how to tie a scarf in a masculine way?

Well in the below chart I give you eleven techniques – each chose because it is first functional and second because it’ll look great on a masculine physique.

Enjoy!

11 ways to tie a scarf for men

Now there are dozens of other ways to tie a scarf.

However if it’s just to accessorize – be careful and realize you are entering the world of male fashion, not classic men’s style.

And if you enjoyed this chart – make sure to grab my FREE ebook here.  I have over 60,000 men on my email newsletter because I deliver amazing content that helps you use clothing to reach your professional and personal goals.

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About Antonio

Antonio Centeno is President of ATailoredSuit.com and the founder of RealMenRealStyle.com. He has created over 700 articles & videos on men's style, blogs over at the Art of Manliness, and is the creator of the internet's best selling personal presentation course - A Man's Guide To Timeless Style. Antonio has studied clothing design in London, Hong Kong, and Bangkok. He is a former US Marine with an MBA from UT Austin and a BA from Cornell College. He loves to hear from old friends and make new ones.

  • Robin Pulewitz

    Nicely done! I especially like the reverse drape cross. This is great info for men.

  • mail33006

    Some of those are a bit too ornate for me. They look more like the bow on a Christmas present. And I could never be comfortable with the Parisian knot- I’d be too paranoid about someone behind me grabbing the ends to choke me out. I gotta stop watching Boardwalk Empire……

  • RMRStyle

    Thanks Robin!

  • mail33006

    Some of those are a bit too ornate for me. They look more like the bow on a Christmas present. And I could never be comfortable with the Parisian knot- I’d be too paranoid about someone behind me grabbing the ends to choke me out. I gotta stop watching Boardwalk Empire……

  • RMRStyle

    Thanks Robin!

  • RMRStyle

    The color of the scarf is bright here – you could go with a simple dark color and it would appear more muted! As for being chocked out – I advice a spiked steel collar – this has helped me in many bar brawls.

  • RMRStyle

    The color of the scarf is bright here – you could go with a simple dark color and it would appear more muted! As for being chocked out – I advice a spiked steel collar – this has helped me in many bar brawls.

  • Chris Cox

    The Reverse Drape Cross is very warm, I can testify. Love that “Cold” weather for you is just this side of “Hibernate” for us in VA.

  • Dgallifrey

    Nice article. I’ve never really heard of some of these ties before!
    It also depends on the material/thickness of the scarf, of course. I’ve got a thin fleece scarf and a 70/30 acrylic/wool, which is much thicker and warmer. Generally, if I’m wearing either of them in a Parisian knot, I don’t have them particularly snug, and then it’s more for looks than warmth. A simple drape shows people that I’m not wearing it for warmth at all. It’s when the temperature drops that I start tucking ends in and pulling everything snug.

  • Dgallifrey

    Nice article. I’ve never really heard of some of these ties before!
    It also depends on the material/thickness of the scarf, of course. I’ve got a thin fleece scarf and a 70/30 acrylic/wool, which is much thicker and warmer. Generally, if I’m wearing either of them in a Parisian knot, I don’t have them particularly snug, and then it’s more for looks than warmth. A simple drape shows people that I’m not wearing it for warmth at all. It’s when the temperature drops that I start tucking ends in and pulling everything snug.

  • Dgallifrey

    Nice article. I’ve never really heard of some of these ties before!
    It also depends on the material/thickness of the scarf, of course. I’ve got a thin fleece scarf and a 70/30 acrylic/wool, which is much thicker and warmer. Generally, if I’m wearing either of them in a Parisian knot, I don’t have them particularly snug, and then it’s more for looks than warmth. A simple drape shows people that I’m not wearing it for warmth at all. It’s when the temperature drops that I start tucking ends in and pulling everything snug.

  • menstyle

    Sounds great Chris!

  • Spades

    Your definition of “cold” is -15 degrees Celsius. What kind of knot are those of us stuck with -30 to -40 on a daily basis supposed to do?

  • Spades

    Your definition of “cold” is -15 degrees Celsius. What kind of knot are those of us stuck with -30 to -40 on a daily basis supposed to do?

  • RMRStyle

    Yeah – I need to expand those ranges :)

  • RMRStyle

    Good points – I’ll address material as we break down each knot and talk about it in a separate article – coming soon!

  • Jeremy

    Love the reverse drape tuck! This is a fantastic graphic.

  • Jeremy

    Love the reverse drape tuck! This is a fantastic graphic.

  • Rebecca

    I liked Reverse drape, easy to tie. Thanks for sharing different tying styles. For more scarves tying styles, you can browse scarfhub blog.