How To Dress Warm In Cold Weather Infographic | Base Layer | Insulating Layers |Outer Protection

It’s been cold here in Wisconsin.

So cold – that I had to use a heater to warm up the oil on my truck before I start it.

So cold that you can get frostbite within 10 minutes of exposing any skin to the elements.

So with that in mind – I present to you how to dress warm in freezing weather!

 

dressing-for-cold-weather-infographic

 

Want to learn more about the jackets I feature in this info-graphicclick here to see my jacket info-graphic.

Want to learn how to tie a scarf 11 waysclick here for my scarf tying info-graphic.

What do you think?

Let me know in the comments!

 

  • Josh Richey

    My feedback would be careful when layering socks as if its too tight inside your boots your feet will not be able to breathe and will sweat. I go with one nice thick pair of wool socks that fit in my boot just right. Just some food for thought. Otherwise pretty spot on.

  • RMRStyle

    With the windbreak trousers focus on the fabric weave and weight/thickness – you want something with a tight and fine weave – jeans are NOT good as wind goes right through. Cotton work pants or even wool flannels/dress pants actually do better when paired with thermals!

  • RMRStyle

    Agreed – that’s why the second pair are optional. The right boots will go a LONG way in keeping your feet warm!

  • RMRStyle

    Thank you Ray – I took a lot of tips from the US Army Cold Weather survival guide and my own experience!

  • RMRStyle

    Well – you never know – someday you might be the epicenter of man’s fight for survival against zombies and this will come in handy when living on the run :)

  • RMRStyle

    FYI – I was an Eagle scout!

  • http://www.dudeism.com/ Latter-Day Dude

    This is pretty much what I do… although, I work in an office and have a two hour commute to and from work where I am catching trains and buses and I spend a lot of time outside in inclement weather with little or no shelters available so I have to dress for bad weather, but still look good for the office. When it comes to long underwear, I wear white/black according to the color of my shirt and bottoms. It’s not so much a concern with the slacks, but I don’t want to show too much through my shirt.

    I also where layered socks with my first pair usually being a pair of Injinji toe socks. They can be expensive, but keep my toes apart and helps keep them warm and prevents blisters and then I put a thick wool sock over them… fantastic… I love them.

    I also wear dress oxford boots… it tends to help with the slush and such and when I’m running to catch a train or bus, I don’t have to worry about them slipping off like you would with a shoe or loafer… but sometimes it’s super slick outside and stations aren’t always cleared of snow and ice so I carry a pair of ice fishing cleats… they’re small and made of rubber so they easily slip on over my boots.

  • http://www.dudeism.com/ Latter-Day Dude

    This is pretty much what I do… although, I work in an office and have a two hour commute to and from work where I am catching trains and buses and I spend a lot of time outside in inclement weather with little or no shelters available so I have to dress for bad weather, but still look good for the office. When it comes to long underwear, I wear white/black according to the color of my shirt and bottoms. It’s not so much a concern with the slacks, but I don’t want to show too much through my shirt.

    I also where layered socks with my first pair usually being a pair of Injinji toe socks. They can be expensive, but keep my toes apart and helps keep them warm and prevents blisters and then I put a thick wool sock over them… fantastic… I love them.

    I also wear dress oxford boots… it tends to help with the slush and such and when I’m running to catch a train or bus, I don’t have to worry about them slipping off like you would with a shoe or loafer… but sometimes it’s super slick outside and stations aren’t always cleared of snow and ice so I carry a pair of ice fishing cleats… they’re small and made of rubber so they easily slip on over my boots.

  • http://www.dudeism.com/ Latter-Day Dude

    This is pretty much what I do… although, I work in an office and have a two hour commute to and from work where I am catching trains and buses and I spend a lot of time outside in inclement weather with little or no shelters available so I have to dress for bad weather, but still look good for the office. When it comes to long underwear, I wear white/black according to the color of my shirt and bottoms. It’s not so much a concern with the slacks, but I don’t want to show too much through my shirt.

    I also where layered socks with my first pair usually being a pair of Injinji toe socks. They can be expensive, but keep my toes apart and helps keep them warm and prevents blisters and then I put a thick wool sock over them… fantastic… I love them.

    I also wear dress oxford boots… it tends to help with the slush and such and when I’m running to catch a train or bus, I don’t have to worry about them slipping off like you would with a shoe or loafer… but sometimes it’s super slick outside and stations aren’t always cleared of snow and ice so I carry a pair of ice fishing cleats… they’re small and made of rubber so they easily slip on over my boots.

  • Toronto Frost

    Timely advice Antonio! I imagine it’s as cold in Wisconsin as it is here in Toronto, Canada where it’s been around -13 and -30 ºF for almost all of January. I do everything the same up to the protective layer where I dress for extreme cold (Minus the ski goggles and insulated snow boots).

  • Toronto Frost

    Timely advice Antonio! I imagine it’s as cold in Wisconsin as it is here in Toronto, Canada where it’s been around -13 and -30 ºF for almost all of January. I do everything the same up to the protective layer where I dress for extreme cold (Minus the ski goggles and insulated snow boots).

  • Steven Masters

    Thanks Antonio, with these 14 degree days in Midland, Texas, I needed this. Stay warm! Oh and by Friday it is supposed to be 80 degrees. Go figure. Did anyone say Polar Vortex? Or was it Global Warming? Ha Ha!

  • Steven Masters

    Thanks Antonio, with these 14 degree days in Midland, Texas, I needed this. Stay warm! Oh and by Friday it is supposed to be 80 degrees. Go figure. Did anyone say Polar Vortex? Or was it Global Warming? Ha Ha!

  • sroyle

    Great article. Almost right out of the manual. Personally, when it gets that cold I like to wrap myself in a nice warm house. Once I got out of the Army I decided I would only be cold and wet when I wanted to be cold and wet. We just had a winter storm here in Atlanta. It changed a 1 hour drive into a three and half hour drive (and I left work early). Many folks had to spend the night away from home. Most business wear is not all that warm and we depend on the car’s heater to keep us warm. It is a wise idea to keep extra clothing in the car. A blanket, an extra insulating layer, socks, watch cap, etc. I keep a pair of BDU pants that are roomy enough to pull over my slacks to add an extra layer. Equally important is keeping your clothes dry. Wet clothing are poor insulators.

  • Andrew

    I’m now really glad I live in Sydney, Australia. Winters here range from 5-20 degrees C.

  • McCord Rees

    That’s great! I would love to here what your most memorable camp was, or what your service project was. Better yet, how did the lessons you learned in scouts help you get through the Marines and to where you are now. IDK maybe I can pull some more lessons from you to teach these fine Young Men.

  • RMRStyle

    That could easily be a 30-60 minute conversation – maybe we’ll have to do an interview! :)

  • RMRStyle

    Steven – great to hear Midland is still the same. Temperatures all over the place, dust everywhere, and tumbleweeds of course!

  • McCord Rees

    LOL. Sounds good.

  • Lost

    Wowzers overkill…. I never wore that many layers even working in the arctic, but everyone has different tolerances and/or adapted to different weather

  • Lost

    Wowzers overkill…. I never wore that many layers even working in the arctic, but everyone has different tolerances and/or adapted to different weather

  • menstyle

    Good for you, Lost!

  • menstyle

    That’s true. Thanks for your input, Sroyle!

  • menstyle

    Canada is colder, I think. Glad to know this came in handy!

  • menstyle

    Haha! Good for you, Andrew!

  • menstyle

    You’re doing everything right. Stay warm and keep safe!

  • Ben Karlin

    Antonio, any advice that includes wearing a ushanka is advice worth taking. Those hats are amazing, warm as all get out, and relatively inexpensive. A real fur ushanka of good quality can be had for a couple hundred bucks or less. Oh, I guess the rest of the outfit is necessary as well. Windchill on exposed flesh is a killer so I see the need for, you know, clothes with the ushanka.

    If a man does opt to wear fur, especially fur hat and coat, or hat and coat collar, or coat and gloves with fur exterior, is he better off trying to match the for type and color for a consistent look? Or should he pick one area for attention and be sure the other garment(s) don’t compete for attention?

  • Joey

    I live in Georgia as well! Everything has been crazy with this “Snowpocalypse”. I pretty much didn’t leave my house for the entire time it was going on. (Definitely agree on staying dry though.)

  • Joey

    I live in Georgia as well! Everything has been crazy with this “Snowpocalypse”. I pretty much didn’t leave my house for the entire time it was going on. (Definitely agree on staying dry though.)

  • menstyle

    My advice is to decide on just one part of your look to involve fur. For instance, if you’re going to wear a fur hat, I think it’s better if your coat does not have fur (vice versa).

  • menstyle

    I hope you are doing good there in Georgia, Joey!