How To Fold A Men’s Dress Shirt – Travel Tips For Folding Shirts

So I’m about to hit the road again.

This time I’m headed to Anaheim, California for VidCon.

I’m also hosting Business With Style, the first official meet-up that I know of for men who are interested in men’s lifestyle and self-improvement.

As such – I need to pack my clothing for travel.

Now I’ve already covered 3 ways to pack a suit jacket.

So today I’m going to share ways to fold a dress shirt for travel.

This new men’s style info-graphic is brought to you by my friends over at Lee Jeans. I’m wearing their modern series denim right now as I type, and find they make great all purpose jeans I can wear in the office, on the road, and even at a conference (matched with a jacket of course!).

Click here to learn more about Lee Modern Series via their new blog.

 

 

3-Ways-To-Fold-A-Shirt-Infographic-800

 

Now you may be wondering – which shirt folding method is best at preventing wrinkles?

Unfortunately I find there isn’t a sure way to completely prevent dress shirt wrinkling through proper folding.

What really determines the amount of wrinkling?

  • The fabric type and weave of the shirt.
  • How long your clothing is packed.
  • How tightly your clothing is packed (less in the luggage the better!).

That being said – rolling works best for me.

But I always touch up my shirts before wearing and schedule time my first day at a conference to prepare all my clothing. It takes just an hour to steam the jackets & trousers, iron the shirts, and shine the shoes while watching ESPN. Then I’m done with it for the week!

 

This new men’s style info-graphic is brought to you by my friends over at Lee Jeans. I’m wearing their modern series denim right now as I type, and find they make great all purpose jeans I can wear in the office, on the road, and even at a conference (matched with a jacket of course!).

Click here to learn more about Lee Modern Series via their new blog.

 

 

Have any cool travel tips to share?

Did you catch my “hat tip” in the info-graphic to my friends that speak British-English?

:)

Let me know in the comments!

  • Jesse Canfield

    We Yanks spell it Traveling, with a single I. Our Friends “across the Pond” spell Travelling with two L’s. Whichever way it is spelled, this is a great infographic.

  • thomas

    Way

  • thomas

    Or fiends

  • Yves_Rocher

    I always write out ‘travelling’ before I remove one of the ‘l’s, I think it’s become hard wired into my neurons.

  • guest

    Do you iron your clothes or steam them? Which one is better? Which one is faster?

  • Adam Telford

    This is perfect timing for me. I am in the process of packing to leave at 7:00 tomorrow morning for an extended trip. I will be applying this tip within the hour. Thank you so much for your continued advice. You are a daily stop on my internet visits. Thank You

  • Ben Hardy

    So the typo that I noticed was “3 way to pack a shirt” It could just be my mind in the gutter but: Yes Please! That sounds like a fun time but a poor way to pack a shirt… I guess “3 WAYS to pack a shirt” would be more practical but less fun…

  • http://www.apopofpurple.wordpress.com/ apopofpurple

    Hi Anthony – thanks for the great tips. I read that you prefer rolling your shirts. May I ask if that is suitable for work shirts? Will it damage the collar in the long run? Thanks!

  • http://learnphotoediting.net/ Patrick Johnson

    The way to pack your luggage properly in one of the important feature of travelling.For reason, that it allows you to keep your clothes in a proper manner and reduces the quantity of luggage while travelling.

    mapdestinations.org

  • http://www.mapdestinations.org/about Paul Long

    The way to pack your luggage properly in one of the important feature of travelling.For reason, that it allows you to keep your clothes in a proper manner and reduces the quantity of luggage while travelling.

    mapdestinations.org

  • Danny

    Very interesting article, thanks.

    The method #1 is what I’ve always used and it works fine for me when I travel, for any type & fabric of shirt. That’s also how I keep my clean shirts on the wardrobe shelves (ironed, folded, stored in a fitted plastic bag to keep the bugs away). The method #2 may not be the best for cotton shirts as it creates unnecessary folds and wrinkles on sleeves, but for soft shirts it may be just fine.

    The method #3 (rolling) also doesn’t seem like a good idea for a cotton dress shirts, as it can make a wrinkly mess out of it (if folded too loose) or do some real damage to sewn-in plastic collar stays or even bust some stitch (if rolled way too forceful & too tight). But for soft, unstructured ultra-casual shirts it may be quite good. I find the rolling method extremely useful when I go camping or climbing, as I have old decommissioned knapsack with two straps on the bottom (originally for army tent cloth) which I use to hold a safari shirt, light jacket or a windstopper rolled into a ‘cloth-loaf’ – it makes carrying it quite convenient and accessible (and wrinkling is not really a problem there).

  • Joseph Muyangata

    Thanks Antonio. I will be travelling soon and this is neat. Awesome ways to deal with shirts as one travels. I liked the fact that you offered several ways to shirt folding not just one way.

  • RMRStyle

    You are welcome Adam!

  • RMRStyle

    You caught it Jesse!

  • RMRStyle

    Welcome Joseph – see you in the Style System :)

  • RMRStyle

    The rolling method can cause issues – but it is very handy for casual shirts or ones you’ll have time to press when arriving to your hotel!

  • RMRStyle

    Depends on the collar – I remove my stays and pop the collar and then press everything when I arrive at my hotel!

  • RMRStyle

    That’s pretty funny Ben!

  • RMRStyle

    Iron cottons, steam dedicates like wool. Steaming is faster with a proper steamer, but ironing gives a crisp look.

  • RMRStyle

    Fixed that!

  • RMRStyle

    Fixed that one as well!

  • Bernard Gabriel Solomon

    Knew about 1 and 2. Have to try 3. Thank you.

  • menstyle

    You’re welcome

  • lana bazadogh

    First method internationally known
    Second method not practical and takes place,because
    Flexion sleeves of three flexion
    Third method (roll a shirt) takes less place and maintains
    almost on clothing if ironed and it is not like the first
    And second method
    The first and second method when you are folded ,after
    That you open the piece and it is becomes un ordered
    And the folding lines more the third method and you
    Have to re-ironing

  • lana bazadogh

    You can rolling your trousers after you ironed
    And you can keep your jacket in private casing after
    You iron it ,and but it in the traveling bag with sleeves flexion,i try it before

  • menstyle

    thanks for sharing your tips

  • menstyle

    Thanks for the feedback

  • Friedlinde Maria Ranz

    “steam dedicates like wool” So sorry, I don’t understand this. Did the writer mean to say “steam delicates like wool?” I do understand “to dedicate a poem to somebody”.

  • menstyle

    Thanks for letting me know about this.

  • menstyle

    Haha! Yeah, that happens to me sometimes!

  • Brett Vaughan

    Travel tips are always appreciated, especially for those of us for whom business means being on the go and constantly in planes or airports. I roll my clothing up also, but I additionally put them into space bags to be vacuumed smaller. For silk or satin or any other delicates, I usually just fold them into the topmost section of the suitcase, or just go with a garment bag, though they’re bulkier. For those who travel often, keeping a small refill size baby wipe package, and travel size toothpaste, mouthwash, and a set of earplugs in your carry-on will move mountains when you’re feeling nasty after so many hours you’ve lost track. Stopped by to check out the goodness posted lately but couldn’t help but comment. This one I actually know about!

  • menstyle

    Thanks for sharing your tips, Brett!